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Turkey Recipes from the Pros

Friday, November 14th, 2014

Extra Sauce: 3 Turkey Recipes from the Pros

November 13th 04:11pm, 2014

  

111314_turkey

 

 

In the hunt for all things local, the Thanksgiving turkey can be a tough bird to find,

with many already spoken for by Nov. 1. Fear not;

we tracked down which area butchers,

grocers and farmers markets are still taking orders for local gobblers.

Buttonwood Farm turkeys are available at several locations

throughout St. Louis. Members of Fair Shares CCSA can place their orders through tomorrow,

Nov. 14 and pick them up Nov. 25.

Soon-to-open Bolyard’s Meat & Provisions is taking orders until Sunday, Nov. 16 with pickup on Nov. 25.

Local Harvest Grocery and all Straub’s locations are accepting orders until they are sold out,

with pick up times varying by location.

Buttonwood Farm birds are also available through Mac’s Local Buys;

orders should be placed by Nov. 21 and can be picked up Nov. 22 and 25 at The Civil Life Brewing Co.

Soulard Farmers Market regulars can stop by the Harr Family Farms booth

now through Nov. 22 to place their orders, too.

And what to do with those hard-won local turkeys?

If anyone knows how to feed a crowd it’s catering chefs,

so we asked for their perfect recipes to wow Thanksgiving guests.

 

Charcoal-Roasted Turkey with Bourbon-Orange Glaze
Courtesy of Butler’s Pantry’s Greg Ziegenfuss
8 to 10 servings

1 gallon plus 1 cup water, divided
1 quart plus 1 cup kosher salt, divided
2 Tbsp. dry thyme
½ cup freshly ground black pepper, divided
3 lb. bag ice
1 gallon plus 2 cups orange juice, divided
12 oz. orange juice concentrate
1 quart plus ½ cup soy sauce, divided
1 quart plus ½ cup bourbon, divided
1 12- to 14-lb. turkey, neck and giblets removed
1 cup vegetable oil
4 large navel oranges, quartered
1 large yellow onion, chopped in large chunks
1 small bunch fresh thyme
½ cup honey
2 tsp. white pepper
1 stick butter

Special equipment: a large brining bag and a second grill or large fireproof metal container

Day 1: Combine the water, 1 quart kosher salt, dry thyme and ¼ cup pepper in a very large heavy-duty pot

and bring to a boil over high heat to dissolve the salt.
• Remove from heat and add the ice. Stir to cool. Add 1 gallon orange juice, the orange juice concentrate,

1 quart soy sauce and 1 quart bourbon. Stir to incorporate.
• Place the turkey in a brining bag, pour the brine over and seal.

Refrigerate overnight or at least 12 hours.
Day 2: Remove the turkey from brine. Thoroughly rinse and pat it dry.

Let the turkey rest at room temperature 1 hour.
• Meanwhile, prepare charcoal grill for high, indirect heat.
• Combine the remaining 1 cup salt, the remaining ¼ cup pepper and the vegetable oil in a bowl

and rub the turkey inside and out with the gritty paste.

Stuff the interior cavity of the turkey with the oranges, onion and fresh thyme.
• Place a drip pan filled with the remaining 1 cup water next to coals to catch any drippings.

Place the turkey breast-side up over indirect heat, cover, and grill 1 hour.
• Meanwhile, after 20 minutes of grilling, prepare another chimney of charcoal on a second grill

or within a fireproof metal container.

Let it burn until the coals are completely gray.
• Meanwhile, create a glaze by bringing to boil the remaining 2 cups orange juice,

the remaining ½ cup soy sauce, the remaining ½ cup bourbon,

 the honey and white pepper over heat high. Remove from the heat and whisk in the butter.
• Baste the turkey with the glaze. Add the fresh, hot charcoal to the grill. If the skin is getting too dark,

tent the turkey with heavy-duty foil to prevent burning. Cover and grill another hour.
• Meanwhile, after 20 minutes of grilling,

prepare another chimney of charcoal on a second grill or within a fireproof metal container.

Let it burn until the coals are completely gray.
• Baste the turkey with the glaze. Add the fresh, hot charcoal to the grill. If the skin is getting too dark,

tent the turkey with heavy-duty foil to prevent burning.

Cover and grill another hour, until a meat thermometer reaches 160 degrees in the thickest part of the breast.

Baste again before removing from the grill.
• Cover the turkey with foil and let rest 30 minutes before carving.

 

Oolong Tea-Smoked Whole Turkey with a Citrus-Tamarind Glaze
Courtesy of Hollyberry Catering’s Kristin Stegmann
10 to 12 servings

1 gallon hot water
2 quarts vegetable broth
1 cup kosher salt
2¼ cups brown sugar, divided
1½ cups oolong tea leaves, divided
1 7-lb. bag ice
1 bunch green onions, roughly chopped
1 cup plus 1 Tbsp. soy sauce
2 lemons, halved
2 oranges, halved
5 garlic cloves, smashed
9 whole star anise, divided
2 cinnamon sticks
4 Tbsp. grated fresh ginger, divided
3 Tbsp. crushed Szechwan peppercorns, divided
Vegetable oil
1 14- to 15-lb. turkey, neck and giblets removed
1 cup uncooked rice
3 cups low-sodium chicken broth
1½ cup freshly squeezed orange juice
¼ cup lemon juice
Zest of 1 orange
Zest of 1 lemon
4 Tbsp. unsalted butter, melted
3 Tbsp. tamarind paste
1 Tbsp. hot Chinese mustard

Special equipment: a clean 13½-gallon cooler (or larger)

Day 1: Combine the vegetable stock, hot water, salt, 1 ½ cup brown sugar

and ½ cup oolong tea leaves in a clean 13½-gallon cooler

and stir until the salt and sugar dissolve.

Stir in the ice, the green onions,

1 cup soy sauce, the lemons, oranges, garlic,

4 whole star anise, cinnamon sticks, 3 tablespoons ginger

and 2 tablespoons peppercorns.

Place the turkey breast-side up in the brine, close the cooler and brine 12 to 24 hours.
Day 2: Remove the turkey from the brine and dry thoroughly. Refrigerate, uncovered,

8 to 12 hours before cooking.
• Prepare a charcoal grill for high, indirect heat or preheat a gas grill to 400 degrees for indirect heat.

Rub the turkey all over with vegetable oil.
• Place 2 large sheets of heavy-duty foil on top of each other and place the tea leaves,

the remaining 5 star anise, rice,

the remaining 1 tablespoon peppercorns and ¼ cup brown sugar in the center.

Fold up the edges to make a small bowl to hold the smoking mixture.

Place the foil bowl directly on the charcoal or,

if using a gas grill,

on the metal bar over the gas flame.
• Place the turkey over indirect heat, cover and smoke 1 hour.
• Meanwhile, prepare the glaze by whisking together the chicken broth,

orange juice, lemon juice, orange zest, lemon zest, the remaining ½ cup brown sugar, butter,

tamarind paste, the remaining 1 tablespoon ginger, mustard and the remaining 1 tablespoon soy sauce.
• After 1 hour, baste the turkey with the glaze. Cover and continue to smoke, basting everything 15 minutes,

until a meat thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the breast reaches 160 degrees.

If the turkey is getting too dark,

tent it loosely with heavy-duty foil.
• Cover the turkey with foil and let rest 1 hour before carving.

 

The Art of Entertaining’s Perfect Turkey
Courtesy of The Art of Entertaining’s Ann Lemcke
12 to 15 servings 

¼ tsp. garlic salt
¼ tsp. dried basil
¼ tsp. dried oregano
¼ tsp. dried thyme
1/8 tsp. poultry seasoning
1 tsp. freshly ground black pepper
¼ tsp. dried rosemary
¼ tsp. dried sage
1 20- to 22-lb. turkey, giblets removed, rinsed and dried
½ cup (1 stick) butter
1 Tbsp. flour

• Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
• Create a turkey rub by mixing together the garlic salt, basil, oregano, thyme, poultry seasoning,

pepper, rosemary and sage in a medium bowl. Set aside.
• Rub butter all over the turkey, inside and out, then rub the turkey down with the spice blend.
• Put the flour inside a roasting bag, close and shake. Place the prepared turkey inside the flour-coated bag

and tie closed. Place the roasting bag in a roasting pan

and cut 4 to 5 slits in the top of the bag. Roast 4 to 5 hours,

until a meat thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the breast reaches 165 degrees.
• Let the turkey rest 30 minutes before carving.

- See more at: http://www.saucemagazine.com/blog/?p=38596#sthash.NOifZN3q.dpuf

Winter Wedding: 10 New Winter Wedding Ideas

Thursday, November 13th, 2014

winter weddings - ideas

Winter Weddings: 10 New Winter Wedding Ideas

Snowflakes and pinecones are tried-and-true winter wedding motifs, but don’t feel bound to these seasonal standbys. Here are 10 ways to reinvent your winter wedding.

Photo: Rita Maas

Wedding Colors

Reds and greens certainly reflect the season, but overdo this color combo, and your wedding may seem more holiday-oriented than you intended.

What’s Hot Now: Consider a less-is-more approach to your color palette: Silver and white with crystal accents can add some serious glamour to your winter wedding. For your ceremony, try a white velvet aisle runner trimmed with white satin ribbon, or decorate the altar with a crystal curtain backdrop adorned with hanging strands of elegant white phalaenopsis orchids. If you’re exchanging vows outdoors, get your guests in on creating the ambience by giving out clear umbrellas to friends and family members as they arrive.

The Flowers

Red roses, calla lilies, and amaryllis are decidedly winter wedding flowers, but if you step outside the flower box, and you’ll find a variety of options for winter blooms.

What’s Hot Now: Consider fuller flowers, such as white hydrangeas and soft ranunculuses. White boutonnieres can be handsome when they’re accented with greenery, but they also look great with a simple white ribbon. Add sparkle to your bouquet by wrapping the stems in ribbon embellished with crystals.

Invitations

Since winter weddings are usually held indoors (it’s an ideal time for ballroom receptions), they often call for a more formal invitations.

What’s Hot Now: A black-tie event is nicely conveyed by heavy cardstock and a navy blue, chocolate-brown, or even eggplant font with hand calligraphy. For a fresh way to achieve a formal tone for your winter wedding, use thick, frosted Plexiglas invitations in white scripted ink. Send the sturdy invites out to all your guests tucked into silver envelope liners.

Centerpieces

Go beyond glowing candles to add both warmth and romance to your reception site.

What’s Hot Now: If you want to heighten the drama, bring in the icy outdoors with ice-carved vases on your reception tables. Have your florist fill the vases with tall winter-white branches and hanging crystals to reflect the light from the tables. Surround the centerpieces with votive candles, and top your tables with white dupioni table linens and frosted glass china.

Escort Cards

Miniature sleighs and holly motifs stamped onto your escort cards would spell out the season pretty clearly, but they might not dazzle your guests.

What’s Hot Now: Leave everyone awestruck as they retrieve their escort cards by making the entire table sparkle. Have the cards hand-calligraphed in silver ink and attach them to individual crystals with a ribbon. Hang each from an oversized crystal candelabra centerpiece for a new take on the popular escort card tree.

The Music

A classical pianist playing during dinner is a sure way to create an elegant ambience, but consider a more unexpected accompaniment.

What’s Hot Now: For a twist on the tunes, consider hiring an a capella quartet to sing background music at your reception. Have the group sing your favorite jazz and pop songs to set a welcoming and festive tone for the evening. If you’re into a more classical sound, hire a cellist and ask that Vivaldi’s “Winter” be included in the repertoire.

Cocktail Hour

A winter cocktail hour calls for warm, comforting drinks. You really can’t go wrong with hot chocolate and warm apple cider, but it’s your wedding — why not take every opportunity (drinks included) to add an element of surprise?

What’s Hot Now: Serve up white hot chocolate in small espresso cups and eggnog in small punch glasses for your guests as they arrive. At the bar, offer saketinis (Japanese rice wine and sweet-flavored vodka) in glasses rimmed with sugar crystals.

The Cake

A wedding cake trimmed in red or green ribbon or topped with roses looks pretty, but bakers who are willing to push the fondant envelope can reflect the winter in totally creative ways.

What’s Hot Now: Play up the season with a white, vintage-style cake, dusted with edible silver powder. For accents, have your baker add a white sugar ribbon and crystal drops cascading down one side of the cake.

Favors

Food wedding favors are always a hit, but if cookies or truffles seem passe, try new treat ideas to send your guests home satisfied.

What’s Hot Now: Give out small packages of chocolate-covered cranberries or roasted chestnuts. An over-the-top idea that will undoubtedly impress: Have your caterer set up a hot chocolate and churros station to top off the evening.

Honeymoons

While many couples flee the blustery weather for warmer (and sandier) locales for their honeymoon, a winter wedding can segue perfectly into a snowy escape.

What’s Hot Now: Embrace the season and rent a cozy log cabin for a week in Lake Placid, or join the jet-setters at a luxurious hotel in Aspen for some serious skiing, wining, dining, and snuggling.

Special thanks to: Leslie Price and Eyal Tessler from In Any Event in New York, NY; and Kate Parker from Kate Parker Weddings in New England.

 Anja Winikka

http://wedding.theknot.com/real-weddings/winter-weddings/articles/10-new-winter-wedding-ideas.aspx

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stress-Free Tips For Hosting And Attending Thanksgiving

Friday, November 7th, 2014

Thanksgiving is an excellent opportunity to relax, enjoy nature’s bounty and spend time with loved ones. Whether you are hosting or attending this Thanksgiving, show your appreciation to those who are special in your life. These stress-free secrets provided by Brian Blasingame, Director of Visual Design at Butler’s Pantry and Greg Ziegenfuss, Executive Chef at Butler’s Pantry, will help deliver an enjoyable holiday. From décor to diet restrictions, gifts and leftovers, the experts at Butler’s Pantry have you covered this Thanksgiving!

Thanksgiving potted plants & gourds centerpieceThanksgiving buffet table arrangement

 

Thanksgiving tall centerpieceThanksgiving place setting favor

  •          Dine Amidst the Outdoors: Thanksgiving is the ideal time to bring gorgeous fall scenery indoors. Place gourds, mini pumpkins, and red apples in small clusters near a sideboard, hutch or fireplace mantle. Collect colorful fallen leaves to intertwine throughout the display.

 

  •          Less is More: Use a minimalist approach to enhance a buffet or serving table. Tall cylinder vases trimmed with colorful leaves and ripe berry stems will complement the meal while allowing delectable dishes take center stage.

 

  •          Set the Mood: Create a harvest centerpiece with the remainder of miniature pumpkins, gourds and colorful fruit. Add herbs and mini mums with burlap- or twine- covered pots. Take a moment to enjoy the outdoors and collect colorful fall leaves for the table, adding beewax taper candles as the final touch. The candles are sure to add a warm harvest glow to the Thanksgiving table.

 

  •          Kids Can Help: Centerpieces do not have to be low and close to the table surface. Go for a tall, airy approach with a centerpiece made of  twigs and branches. Kids will enjoy selecting and collecting these items from the yard, or on a walk. Tie the leaves to yard-found branches with natural twine or colorful ribbon, and place  in a tall vase or urn. Kids will beam with pride as guests admire their creation at the center of the Thanksgiving meal!

 

  •          Double-Up: Place settings and nametags can double as favors for guests to take home. Personalize favors to suit the tastes of visitors. If they enjoy baking, cookie cutters tagged with a leaf shaped namecard and tied with colorful autumn ribbon will surely be used during holiday baking. Or, fill miniature jars with whole cloves and dried citrus peel. Attach a vintage- style sticker inscribed with each guest’s name to double as a charming placecard setting. This will be put to good use in tasty hot drinks to help ward off the chill of months to come.

 

  •          Please All Guests: Accomodating guest’s diet restrictions is important for an enjoyable meal. Rosemary Pumpkin Hummus, Vegetarian Acorn Squash Bisque and Spinach Salad with truffle vinaigrette are delicious vegetarian and gluten-free starters.

 

  •          For the Host or Hostess: If you are attending Thanksgiving this year, bring a favor for the host or hostess! Consider individual interests. For example, if they enjoy cooking, a basket of specialty spices and culinary delicacies such as saffron, truffle oil and small-batch fig jam are thoughtful options. Arrange these items in a basket lined with an attractive tea towel to get spirits soaring.

 

  •          Weekend Guests: Provide all the fixings for the infamous day-after-Thanksgiving turkey sandwich. Utilize fresh apples for a turkey, apple and brie sandwich. Additional tasty options include a turkey caprese sandwich, a turkey BLT, or a grilled turkey Cuban. The turkey sandwich allows guests to help themselves and minimalizes confusion in an unfamiliar kitchen!

 

About Butler’s Pantry

Butler’s Pantry, a second-generation business founded in 1966, provides innovative and creative catering services for corporate functions, social events, NFP galas and weddings of all sizes. Located in Lafayette Square, Palladium Saint Louis is their premier event venue, accommodating up to 400 seated or 700 standing. Bixby’s, the public restaurant located on the second floor of the Missouri History Museum, serves lunch daily and Sunday brunch. With a focus on Dining with Local Influence, Bixby’s was voted one of “America’s Best” museum restaurants by Travel + Leisure. Butler’s Pantry also operates Café Madeleine, serving French-inspired Sunday brunch in the Piper Palm House in Tower Grove Park, the oldest greenhouse west of the Mississippi River. The newest brand opened in spring of 2013: Piccione Pastry is the only late-night Italian pastry shop of its kind in the St. Louis area, featuring single-serve Italian desserts and rich Italian coffees.  www.butlerspantry.com

 

 

 

 

 

Chef Chuck’s Special Hobby

Friday, October 17th, 2014

Check out this video of Chef Chuck discussing backyard beekeeping and tasty recipes incorporating all natural honey!

 

http://www.ksdk.com/story/entertainment/television/show-me-st-louis/2014/10/17/beekeeping-chef/17434597/

 

SEVEN TRENDS BRIDES NEED TO KNOW

Tuesday, October 14th, 2014

Fall is the perfect season to present the new wedding trends for floral arrangements, color palettes and décor. Brian Blasingame, Butler’s Pantry’s Director of Visual Design and co-owner of The Rebel Florist, offers varying styles, hot from Hollywood, to help create a look that suits each couple’s personal style and taste. Whether the bride and groom prefer a romantic, subdued look or a dramatic and edgy atmosphere, follow these trends to help create a memorable look that will be special to you for years to come.

 

“At weddings and events, expect to see romantic, elegant and sophisticated décor,” said Blasingame. “Brides and grooms are striving to create environments that are warm and inviting with varying trends like the glamourous roaring twenties and dramatic Victorian with elegant, yet edgy, pops of color.”

 

  •          Wedding color palettes are tending towards the subdued. Delicate splashes of neutrals are all the rage, playing with a mix of soft, subtle tones like beige, blush, nude, light pink, and peach. This combination sets sophistication.

 

  •          Strong repetitive mixes of tone-on-tone shades of purples and monochromatic yellow continue to gain popularity for those seeking a drama. The combination of deep purples and lavender are feminine, with an edge, making it agreeable for both the bride and groom. When combined with elegant touches of silver or earthy accents, both light and dark hues take on a romance.

 

  •          Brides this season favor bouquets and centerpieces that are predominantly white but include light touches of romantic neutrals. Choose varieties like peonies, hydrangea, perennials, and garden roses. Rich mixes of popular garden flowers combined with unique foliage, fragrant herbs, trailing tendrils, vines, ferns and ripe berries evoke a deep sensory experience.

 

  •          After the popularity of Chevron prints in 2013, the trend evolved to strong stripes and elegant floral prints. Many brides are favoring upscale linens featuring these robust patterns. Be bold with patterns in the invitations and décor. Add prints to bouquets by wrapping wide ribbons around bouquet handles.

 

  •          Ornamental components for weddings this fall bridge a chasm of extremes. From regal glamour to earthy and elemental, unusual materials lead the way. Touches of metallic gold or prismatic crystal lend themselves perfectly. A natural Birchwood-framed chuppah adorned with foliage and rich garland provides enchantment. Drape foliage and garland on the cocktail bar, chairs, and above archways for this popular simplistic touch.

 

  •          Greg Ziegenfuss, Executive Chef of Butler’s Pantry, says that 2014 brides and grooms have moved beyond the standard catering fare and expect restaurant-quality. Grilled beef tenderloin filet with cabernet shallot demi-glaze, eggplant napoleon, and grilled Mahi Mahi with Thai red curry sauce are featured on Butler’s Pantry’s 2014 menu. Family-style and stationed dining are this year’s hot alternative service styles. These dining styles are elegant, interactive and fun.

 

  •          Late-night snacks are still a big hit. From St. Louis comfort foods to indoor food trucks, carnival stations and late-night breakfast, these snacks are sure to please!

 

“We’re always on the lookout for what’s trending in the event industry,” says Blasingame. “Creating a personalized space and weaving individual tastes for wedded couples is our specialty.”

 

For more information, visit www.butlerspantry.com or call 314-664-7680.

 

About Butler’s Pantry

Butler’s Pantry, a second-generation business founded in 1966, provides innovative and creative catering services for corporate functions, social events, NFP galas and weddings of all sizes. Located in Lafayette Square, Palladium Saint Louis is their premier event venue, accommodating up to 400 seated or 700 standing. Bixby’s, the public restaurant located on the second floor of the Missouri History Museum, serves lunch daily and Sunday brunch. With a focus on Dining with Local Influence, Bixby’s was voted one of “America’s Best” museum restaurants by Travel + Leisure. Butler’s Pantry also operates Café Madeleine, serving French-inspired Sunday brunch in the Piper Palm House in Tower Grove Park, the oldest greenhouse west of the Mississippi River. The newest brand opened in spring of 2013: Piccione Pastry is the only late-night Italian pastry shop of its kind in the St. Louis area, featuring single-serve Italian desserts and rich Italian coffees.  www.butlerspantry.com

Wedding Bloggers Talk Food Trends

Tuesday, October 7th, 2014

We picked the brains of four top wedding bloggers to compile a list of 12 of this season’s latest food trends. From food trucks to buttoned-up comfort food and “Gatsby”-inspired grub, couples are shying away from the traditional sit-down dinner and getting creative with fun and lighthearted nuptial fare. Our list is sure to inspire, and satisfy, all of you foodie brides-to-be for your big day.

Credit: Elisabeth Perotin Photographie/OneWed.com

Do Brunch

“Brunch has become popular lately because daytime weddings are cheaper than doing dinnertime or afternoon. I’m also seeing people doing breakfast for dinner — like omelets or pancakes.” – Jen Campbell, GreenWeddingShoes.com editor and creative director.

“A big one is brunch-themed weddings. They might have mimosas, bloody marys, an omelet station… daytime weddings like this are really trending, especially since they are usually less expensive.” – Azure Nelson, OneWed.com editorial director.

Credit: Sarah Yates/GreenWeddingShoes.com

Think Fresh

“People are turning to fresh, organic foods sourced locally. They might look for caterers that source out as locally and organic as possible.” – Christina Friedrichsen, IntimateWeddings.com owner and editor.

“Today there is almost an expectation of local, seasonal ingredients at weddings. Caterers are thinking more toward the lines of organic and farm fresh foods.” – Anja Winikka, TheKnot.com site director.

Credit: Christina Friedrichsen/IntimateWeddings.com

Get Involved

“Another big trend is instead of passed food during the cocktail hour, making food more of an experience… like a bar with a chef shucking oysters, or a guacamole bar with a chef muddling ingredients together in front of you — its fun to watch.” – Anja Winikka, TheKnot.com site director.

Credit: Sweetwater Portraits By Julie Melton/TheKnot.com

Truck It

“One of the biggest things right now is people incorporating fun foods in every aspect of the wedding — like food trucks for instance. Maybe it’ll be a couple’s favorite ice cream truck.” – Christina Friedrichsen, IntimateWeddings.com owner and editor.

“Food trucks are definitely very popular in cities like Seattle, New York or Austin. They’re great for outdoor weddings, because they can come directly to your location.” – Jen Campbell, GreenWeddingShoes.com editor and creative director.

Credit: Joielala Photographie/GreenWeddingShoes.com

Ingredient Fix

“Themes are big — an ode to salt, for example, where you have salt on all different kinds of flavors — chocolate caramel salt, bacon salt — there are a million different kinds of salts that you can feature.” – Anja Winikka, TheKnot.com site director.

“Some interesting theme-y tables I’ve seen are like a station featuring bacon, with bacon wrapped shrimp, bacon salt, bacon donuts, and even a bacon cocktail — bacon is really trendy in the food world right now. Or truffles… like truffle burger, or sliders, and truffle mac and cheese.” – Jen Campbell, GreenWeddingShoes.com editor and creative director.

Credit: Great Performances Catering/TheKnot.com

Get Comfortable

“Couples are really loving buttoned-up comfort foods — but it’s still about presentation. You wouldn’t serve french fries in McDonald’s bags, but they might be served in monogram bags instead.” – Anja Winikka, TheKnot.com site director.

“Cocktail hour is becoming more representative of the couple — it’s being used more to showcase a couple’s favorite foods.” – Azure Nelson, OneWed.com editorial director.

Credit: Blue Lotus Photography/OneWed.com

Go Rustic

“Rustic weddings are very popular right now. The food is usually served family style, with buffet tables instead of round tables. We

Credit: Christina Friedrichsen/IntimateWeddings.com

Live Like Gatsby

“Something really theme-y and trendy right now is ‘The Great Gatsby,’ with a garden party feel. Some things that can come out of that are tea sandwiches, champagne cocktails or champagne towers, which are making a comeback.” – Anja Winikka, TheKnot.com site director.

“‘The Great Gatsby’ is huge right now. Even before the buzz of the movie, vintage and art deco styles were pretty popular. Or a speakeasy-type theme.” – Azure Nelson, OneWed.com editorial director.

Credit: Elizabeth Messina/TheKnot.com

Feel at Home

“Flights are a big trend at the cocktail hour or even at the reception. It may be wine tasting, or beer flights — maybe from breweries around where you’re from. For example, if you went to college in the Midwest — you might serve beer from a great local brewery there.” – Anja Winikka, TheKnot.com site director.

“If you grew up in the South or the North and now live somewhere else, it’s nice to have something to represent that. Like a lobster roll or clam chowder if you’re from New England. Or if you’re from Savannah, Ga., maybe peach cobbler or something with peaches. Or a Wisconsin mac and cheese bar.” – Jen Campbell, GreenWeddingShoes.com editor and creative director.

Credit: Lindsey Hahn Photography/TheKnot.com

Drink Up

“Beverage stations are very popular — whether it’s a signature cocktail that the couple creates, or different stations that aren’t necessarily alcoholic. A station might have coffee, tea, infused water or milk and cookies.” – Christina Friedrichsen, IntimateWeddings.com owner and editor.

“I see a lot of flavored lemonades, especially before the ceremony in big jugs or in mason jars with pinstripe straws like something you would see on Pinterest.” – Jen Campbell, GreenWeddingShoes.com editor and creative director.

Credit: This Modern Romance/GreenWeddingShoes.com

Fake the Cake

“A few years ago, everyone was loving cupcakes at their weddings. Now, its pies, macaron cakes, crepe cakes — more non-traditional desserts.” – Azure Nelson, OneWed.com editorial director.

“Brides are leaning more toward cakes now — they’re making a comeback. Because of Pinterest creativity has really exploded, not just with cakes but with everything involved in a wedding. There’s so much more imagery out there — a bride can see a cake, bring it to a local bakery and say, ‘I want this.’ It

Credit: Chi Photography of Charleston/OneWed.com

An Autumnal Southern Wedding Shoot (With Bourbon Bar And Honey Tasting!)

Thursday, September 11th, 2014

By:

A stiff drink and a side of sweet: it’s everything we love about the South rolled into a crisp fall wedding shoot! Steal-worthy ideas include a sophisticated bourbon-only bar and a genius honey-tasting hor d’oeuvres table. Small floral arrangements from Salt Harbor Designs have a heavy helping of just-picked greenery to  keep the vibe rustic yet refined. Get in the Southern state of mind with these gorgeous shots from Millie Holloman Photography, y’all!

Photo: Millie Holloman Photography // Featured: The Knot Blog

Tip: Instead of a single overflowing centerpiece, go for a few lower ones that allow guests to enjoy the venue’s natural beauty.

Photo: Millie Holloman Photography // Featured: The Knot Blog

 

Photo: Millie Holloman Photography // Featured: The Knot Blog

 

Tip: Just because you’re having a garden wedding doesn’t mean it has to be an English-themed one. Loose and unstructured floral arrangements placed in ceramic vases have a look that feels homemade, adding a touch of down-home Southern charm.

Photo: Millie Holloman Photography // Featured: The Knot Blog

 

Tip: For a truly Southern touch, set up a tasting table with a few types of Bourbon (a Southern staple), instead of serving a signature cocktail. Be sure to include the correct accoutrements, such as decanters and specialty glassware.

Photo: Millie Holloman Photography // Featured: The Knot Blog

 

Photo: Millie Holloman Photography // Featured: The Knot Blog

 

Tip: Go with a fresh idea when it comes to your hors d’oeuvres; one is a Southern honey-tasting table. Serve with sweet and savory bites to please everyone’s tastes.

Photo: Millie Holloman Photography // Featured: The Knot Blog

 

Photo: Millie Holloman Photography // Featured: The Knot Blog

 

Photo: Millie Holloman Photography // Featured: The Knot Blog
Photo: Millie Holloman Photography // Featured: The Knot Blog

 

Tip: For a spin on the typical bridal bouquet, use more than flowers. By including lots of greenery, you not only add unexpected color and texture, you end up with a cheery product that has a just-picked look.

Photo: Millie Holloman Photography // Featured: The Knot Blog

 

Photo: Millie Holloman Photography // Featured: The Knot Blog

 

Photo: Millie Holloman Photography // Featured: The Knot Blog

 

Tip: Having multiple cakes can add some depth to an otherwise mundane dessert table. Keep the look interesting by varying the design on the sweet treats. While the two side cakes are decorated with a honeycomb design inspired by the vases, the middle one mimics the linen instead.

Photo: Millie Holloman Photography // Featured: The Knot Blog

 

Photo: Millie Holloman Photography // Featured: The Knot Blog

 

(From the album: Southern Spirits — A New Twist on Tradition)

 

Check out The Knots blog at: http://blog.theknot.com/2013/09/17/an-autumnal-southern-wedding-shoot/

 

 

 

 

Support Local Retailers

Thursday, September 4th, 2014

Our president Richard Nix Jr. recommends this article below from Sophisticated Living Magazine. Nix endorses the perspective of his friend, Craig Kaminer that was published in this months edition of SLM. Kaminer leads the article with the importance of supporting our locally owned retailers and will continue to encourage people to buy locally.  Kaminer said, “No matter where I travel this year, I’m buying everything in St. Louis, and I encourage everyone I know to do the same.”

 

Click on this link to read more about the article http://slmag.net/

bp blog 2

 

SL Article (1112x1500)

 

 

 

Celebrate National Honey Month

Wednesday, September 3rd, 2014

Don’t forget to Celebrate National Honey Month!

Watch Chef Chuck Friedhoff talk about his passion of raising honey bees as he shares one of his tasty honey creations!

Check it out!

http://fox2now.com/2014/09/03/celebrate-national-honey-month/

Celebrate your milestone birthday in style

Tuesday, September 2nd, 2014

All birthdays are special, but perhaps none more so than those ending with the big zero: 30, 40, 50, 60 and beyond.

If you’re reading this, you’ve probably hit one or more of those fabulous milestone events.

Families celebrate other milestone birthdays, too, such as 13, 16, 18, 21 and 75.

Milestone birthdays are fun and memorable. Eighteen, for example, has a special meaning. You’re legal. Twenty-one is the legal drinking age, and at 30, birthday girls and boys begin to plan their future: family, purchasing a home and choosing a career path to get through the next milestone birthdays.

And then there’s 50. You’ve reached the half-century mark. Turning 50 is a huge milestone worthy of a big fancy celebration.

Milestone birthday parties go above and beyond a typical birthday bash of food, drinks, balloons and gifts. They’re the birthdays where memories are a special occasion.

Themes and activities are high on the list for milestone birthday planning. It’s an event to pull out all the stops. It’s the best excuse for a blowout party. Top themes this year include Era parties, James Bond and World’s Fair parties. In St. Louis, caterers are seeing a rise in neighborhood themed parties, such as Soulard-themed and the Hill-themed parties.

As director of sales and catering at Butler’s Pantry in Lafayette Square, Melody Buckner and her team have thrown their share of spectacular milestone birthday parties.

“One that we just did this past weekend was an ’80s throwback ball,” says Buckner. Their customer was celebrating her 40th but decided to celebrate the era instead of the big 4-0. Guests were decked out in ’80s attire, and even the Butler’s Pantry staff was dressed in ’80s garb. A platform at the door was designed by Exclusive Events, and guests traveled through time viewing icons and events from the ’80s. Food from the period was served, including a Tater Tots bar with different cheeses and peppers, pizza pockets and even Pac-Man cupcakes (adult style).

Recently, Buckner and her team planned a celebration for two women celebrating 50. The number 100 was present throughout the celebration with a giant 100 used as a backdrop for photo opportunities. They also designed a cake in the shape of 100.

“Group parties are high on the list, too,” adds Buckner. You can split the bill planning a party together.

“I celebrated for 30 days straight before my 30th birthday,” says Dawn Lynch of St. Louis. Her best friend secretly organized “30 Days of Dawn.”

For the 30 days leading up to her birthday, family members and friends each took one day and planned a surprise or event.

“After a few days, I put the pieces together of what was happening and was in suspense every day for what was to come,” she adds.

Her surprises included: showing up for a hair appointment and being told it was already paid for, edible arrangements and flower deliveries to her house and office, coming home to a clean house and presents everywhere, dinners, drinks, brunch, ice cream and lunches.

“One day I got a video sent to my phone every hour.” She was blown away at the time and effort put in by each person who was involved. It was all capped off with an incredible and memorable party.

“You never need a reason to travel and explore, but traveling in celebration for milestone birthdays has grown in popularity,” says Marcie Boyle, president of Travel Leaders Chesterfield (owned and operated by RSVP Events & Travel).

She plans milestone birthday trips every week for every age: 21, 30, 40, 50, 60; they’ve even helped a client celebrate an 85th birthday on the Rocky Mountaineer, a Canadian train tour company.

“The biggest trend we see in group celebration travel is the all-inclusive resort destinations such as Jamaica, Punta Cana, Puerto Vallarta and Riviera Maya,” she adds. These types of trips offer amazing resort options that cater to all ages, budgets and preferences. “Travelers love all-inclusive options because all expenses are included for one price, and they can celebrate their special day without worrying about the cost of a celebratory cocktail or dessert.”


IDEAS FOR MILESTONE BIRTHDAY GIFTS

Photo collages

• Christine Stark owner of Picket Fence Crafts in Bourbonnais, Ill., creates custom collage numbers and letters for milestone birthdays. “Each number tells a story,” Stark says. The story comes from the photographs that customers send her.

Digital photos are sharpened, laser printed, resized, hand cut and arranged on high-density fiber board. The numbers can be hung by Velcro or placed on an easel.

Each number is about 13 inches high and 7 inches wide. You’ll spend about $199 on two numbers in black and white, or $250 for color.

• A birthday photo collage, designed by a pro, can be a treasured gift. Using a collection of Polaroids, photographs or digital files, ProCollage artists will work with you to create a personalized keepsake. An 18-inch by 24-inch black-and-white photo collage, with 24 pictures, is about $230.


Money tree

A money tree is a hot item on Pinterest and other sites for milestone birthday gifts. We created our own version of a money tree. It took about 20 minutes from start to finish. You’ll need:

2 small branches with lots of mini branches

Rocks

Sand

Dollar bills

Paper clips

1. Find two small branches with lots of small branches to fit inside a gardening container. Remove all leaves from both branches.

2. Tie the two branches together (we used a rubber band). Stand the branch inside a flower pot and fill the pot half way with small rocks. Add enough sand to hold the branches in place.

3. Attach a dollar bill with a paper clip to the small branches. Repeat until every branch is filled.


Art prints

• Take a stroll down memory lane with Birthday Street art prints. The personalized print starts at $395, unframed and $465 framed for a 10-inch-by-20-inch) at Yourmemorylane.com. 

 

August 31, 2014 11:00 am  • 

 

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